Supporting A Child With Anxiety

Have you ever felt that creeping feeling of insecurity literally crawl up your body? It gives you the shakes, it makes you feel like you want to run as fast and as far as you can. It makes you feel like adrenaline is coursing its way through your body and the come down from this is horrible sometimes. Now, picture that in a child.

Children are curious. They’re sensitive and need reassuring that the world is on their side, that you as a parent are on their side. Children are sensitive to the world around them and they recognize when they are feeling anxious. Anxiety is not just for adults – contrary to popular belief. Children may not look like they have a care in the world, but inside they can be very insecure. This sometimes presents itself as a sensitivity to light or sounds and sometimes, when the anxieties get too much, violence can present itself. Children cope with anxiety in a different way to adults, and understanding how to support a child who is suffering with anxiety attacks can sometimes be difficult.

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When you are a parent, you can feel helpless. Finding the funds for extra support for a child who is more sensitive to the world than others can be hard, and as anxiety is not a visible disability, it’s often dismissed as something to ‘get over’. Unfortunately, just like with adults, children cannot just ‘get over’ anxiety. Consulting an attorney with mydisabilityattorney.com to discuss options and getting help with funds to support your child is sometimes your only option. It’s also an option you absolutely should pursue. Your child deserves just as much support as any neuro-typical individual and it’s up to you to fight for it.

Supporting a child who is anxious is not easy, but it’s something that you adapt to. It’s never the goal to eliminate the anxiety or the fear that a child is feeling, but to help them understand it, manage it and sometimes overcome it. If there are certain situations that make your child anxious, the worst possible thing you could do is avoid it. Instead, prepare them for what’s ahead. If crowded places that have a lot of noise makes them feel worried, noise cancelling headphones and a distraction technique can help. Get rid of the noise in the room with the headphones and add a colouring book and crayons to centre their focus. There’s nothing worse than having to face a fear but children are far more resilient than adults are and therefore are able to overcome their anxieties faster.

Positivity is the central theme to managing an anxious child. Small footsteps toward little goals is the best way forward in your family, and making your child feel secure and happy is the ultimate goal. It’s always important to make sure your child feels validated; that they understand how they feel is not a bad thing. They need to feel empowered and happy in their day to day life and it’s up to you to make that happen for them.

Have you ever felt that creeping feeling of insecurity literally crawl up your body? It gives you the shakes, it makes you feel like you want to run as fast and as far as you can. It makes you feel like adrenaline is coursing its way through your body and the come down from this is horrible sometimes. Now, picture that in a child.

Children are curious. They’re sensitive and need reassuring that the world is on their side, that you as a parent are on their side. Children are sensitive to the world around them and they recognize when they are feeling anxious. Anxiety is not just for adults – contrary to popular belief. Children may not look like they have a care in the world, but inside they can be very insecure. This sometimes presents itself as a sensitivity to light or sounds and sometimes, when the anxieties get too much, violence can present itself. Children cope with anxiety in a different way to adults, and understanding how to support a child who is suffering with anxiety attacks can sometimes be difficult.

Image Source

When you are a parent, you can feel helpless. Finding the funds for extra support for a child who is more sensitive to the world than others can be hard, and as anxiety is not a visible disability, it’s often dismissed as something to ‘get over’. Unfortunately, just like with adults, children cannot just ‘get over’ anxiety. Consulting an attorney with mydisabilityattorney.com to discuss options and getting help with funds to support your child is sometimes your only option. It’s also an option you absolutely should pursue. Your child deserves just as much support as any neuro-typical individual and it’s up to you to fight for it.

Supporting a child who is anxious is not easy, but it’s something that you adapt to. It’s never the goal to eliminate the anxiety or the fear that a child is feeling, but to help them understand it, manage it and sometimes overcome it. If there are certain situations that make your child anxious, the worst possible thing you could do is avoid it. Instead, prepare them for what’s ahead. If crowded places that have a lot of noise makes them feel worried, noise cancelling headphones and a distraction technique can help. Get rid of the noise in the room with the headphones and add a colouring book and crayons to centre their focus. There’s nothing worse than having to face a fear but children are far more resilient than adults are and therefore are able to overcome their anxieties faster.

Positivity is the central theme to managing an anxious child. Small footsteps toward little goals is the best way forward in your family, and making your child feel secure and happy is the ultimate goal. It’s always important to make sure your child feels validated; that they understand how they feel is not a bad thing. They need to feel empowered and happy in their day to day life and it’s up to you to make that happen for them.

Posted in Behavior and Discipline

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